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tbenefi33
How do you slow a camera speed ?
robcat2075
explain what you want more
Tom
It sounds like he might be trying to achieve something like a super slow mo that is seen in action films..when people are fighting and everything slows way down..
That's just a guess..

although..how would you achieve the effect that I just described?

Maybe...just make a regular speed action and then pad it out by quadrupling the action when it is dropped into choreography?

Tom
robcat2075
QUOTE(Tom @ Dec 28 2011, 09:28 PM) *
It sounds like he might be trying to achieve something like a super slow mo that is seen in action films..when people are fighting and everything slows way down..
That's just a guess..

although..how would you achieve the effect that I just described?


One way woudl be to stretch out the key frames at the intended time . You woudl need to do that accurately for every object in your chor.


Another way would be to set the FPS to a much higher rate and render that for just the time interval you need the slow down. edit that section into your normal fps footage.
jason1025
Robert explained it but ill give the same info from my perspective.


In live action slow motion is generally done by shooting at a fast frame rate like 48fps or 120 fps or 360fps. Then the film is played back at 24 frames per second the standard frame rate for film and episodic television. This gives the highest quality slow motion.

WHen shooting miniatures 48fps or 120fps. The live action miniature needs to move in real life much much much faster than normal speed to achieve the desired effect of proper weight and mass.

In CG this effect is much easier. Set your project frame rate at 24fps. In the area where you want to slow down the motion of the cg simply highlight the key frames and stretch them out. Alternatively with slightly less control of ramping the slow motion you could set the frame rate to 360fps and then tell quicktime pro or after effects to play the frames back at 24fps.

One other part of the equation which is important but not a rule is motion blur or shutter speed / angle in a real life camera. Depending on what you are shooting it will be necessary to experiment with different motion blurs or shutter speeds.


I recommend watching a scene from a movie exhibiting the effect you want to duplicate. Try to copy the amount of motion blur they used. Under normal live action conditions or live action mixed with cg elements a 50% motion blur is normal. In entirely cg movies I think its about 30%

This is subjective but these are good jumping off points.

For Slow mo I think less is better. Maybe even off in some situations.
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