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martin
Day 1

To recap: long ago I wanted to make movies… Don’t you? There were some years of prep time: shorts, a children’s book (“Why Does the Wind Blow?”), and my first feature-length film, “Telepresence." In the mean time, a small cadre of wide-eyed youngsters joined me in writing the computer program, “Animation:Master,” to propel us towards my moviemaking goal… I thought. Actually, we got lost about 1999 after my short “Where Do the Birds Go?” didn’t turn out so good (got finished but ended up in a drawer someplace); wide-eyed innocence morphed into families & responsibility; people and focus drifted away. Finally in 2005, I started making movies again! Over the Internet! With you, A:M customers! It was awesome! We finally finished that movie a couple weeks ago. You can read about the trials and tribulations in the “Tin Woodman of Oz “ (TWO) "Hackfest" blog in the “Archive” area of this forum, and the 6-part “TWO Production Diary” series in “3D World” magazine from 2007.

(I know people will only read about a paragraph of something posted in a forum so I’ll try and keep my daily comments brief - but watch for tomorrow's posting!)
martin
Day 2

Where were we? Oh, yeah – making movies, (I love the sound of that).

I’m an amateur in all things – and PROUD OF IT! As an amateur, I’m totally uncritical of the work of other amateurs. This worked out pretty well on TWO because when we stalled about a year into the project (without any animation to show for it), I made a forum-wide plea for all amateurs to come help – and they DID! And we finished! Thank you, amateurs!

Over 200 people boiled away while working on TWO, and I could not have predicted who would turn into the superstars – but I know I love ‘em. Joy to work with! Makes it all worthwhile! It's also an awesome team of uncritical people, and most continued onto SO.
martin
Day 3

I wrote “Scarecrow of Oz” (adapted from L. Frank Baum’s book) during the New Year, the year before TWO finished… That’s got to tell you something - the optimism that we would finish TWO was always there. I thought TWO was an “A-” story (and story is EVERYTHING), and I think SO is also an “A-“ story. I love watching TWO, and the story holds up after repeated viewings. Similarly, I love reading the SO script, so I know we’re onto something. I actually don’t care what other people think – as long as I LIKE IT! (And my mom. Oh, and my wife… Me, my mom and my wife gotta like it.)

martin
Day 4

Things were so up in the air at the end of 2007 that we didn’t know if another movie was possible so we started SO in a private forum where only a few people could read it. I posted the script and some preliminary designs out of the original book; the Disney interpretation (from a 1960’s recording); and some interpretations by A:Mer, Robert Kelley, then I stood back to see what would happen… Would there be activity? Who would step up and contribute?

Ahhhh… We had ignition in the SO private area. It was great! It was wonderful! Making movies is awesome! I used to really be concerned about who was “in,” who was “out,” but nothing about human nature surprises me anymore – I just go with the flow.

martin
Day 5

The way moviemaking goes, (at least the way we do it), is kind of an evolutionary thing… We start with one script… And make something else (close though). In TWO, we added songs. (Yikes, did that ever cause controversy!) But the songs are one of the things that take TWO over the top – really make it shine! The songs in TWO are better in the movie than just listening to them! The whole is greater than the some of the parts! I’m too scared to mention it now but, “shhhhhh…, SO is going to have some songs too.” (Keep it a secret for a while, will ya? So the others have a chance for the idea to sink in.)

martin
Day 6

Recording the voice actors on TWO was a mess. It caused lots of unnecessary controversy and there was a ton of clean-up in Post Production. One of the things we were really going to change on SO was to get the voice acting done early! Well… That didn’t work out either. Casting and getting voice performances together is HARD! (Did I mention that making movies is HARD?) We did learn a lot about good voice performances on TWO though, and we’re trying to take those things into account. So far, we have recorded the voice parts of: Cap'n Bill, Trot, Ork, Witch, Googly-Goo & Pessim.

martin
Day 7: (Week I)

There’s a short list of VERY IMPORTANT changes we’re making between TWO and SO:
  1. Keep all scenes using the same set in one chor and transition between Cameras instead of making new Projects.
  2. Don’t embed lights in the model – instead use Lightrigs.
  3. Constrain a Lightrig to the Camera and use Lightlists with these Lights, (to make sure the characters are lit).
  4. Add a new “Keyframe” stage between Layout & Animation, with each Sequence performed by a single animator.
  5. “Final” render as we go!
martin
Day 8

What really got TWO started was “Hackfest.” That was the “call to arms” for all amateurs to report to duty and start animating – competent or not … Me included! Yikes! Did we ever turn out some bad animation!? But we got started and by the end of the first year, every hacker still in Hackfest had improved, (I was still embarrassing but other people got pretty darn good!) The morale of the story is: no matter how bad you think you are, everybody in this boat is going to be supportive and encouraging… We’ve been where you are.
martin
Day 9

An A:Mer who’s been out in the professional animation world for a bunch of years, and has lots of miles on him so I believe what he says, told me, “modelers are a dime a dozen; layout guys have a little more value; but animators are king in this business.” I’ve always wondered why more modelers don’t become animators? The thing about animating that’s magical is when the Render Farm is churning out frame after frame of beautiful pictures for relatively little extra work from the original modeling and lighting.

martin
Day 10

When I was editing TWO, if a particularly good scene came by, I’d say out loud, “that’s a great bit.” Unfortunately, I’d also comment out loud on a weak scene. I wasn’t paying attention to who did what (who could keep that straight, anyway?) Inevitably, the person sitting next to me would have done one of those scenes… It’s human nature that if I said the scene was good, they took it in stride, but if I’d commented negatively, it really hurt their feelings. My bad.

martin
Day 11

On TWO, about a third of the way through, I started sending out weekly emails to all the active participants. (As I mentioned previously, those “active” people were an ever changing group.) I’m going to start doing that again. Usually, before I send out an email to someone, I look at their assignment for the week and see how they’re doing, and I encourage them. I don’t think I’ve ever been a critic. (Did I mention that I don’t believe in criticism?)

martin
Day 12

Wow, there sure are some enthusiastic new SOers! It’s going to be great having you. If you’re a brand new A:M customer, and want to get involved in SO, do TaoA:M first! You’ve got to at least know enough about the software that the old-timers know you’re serious… They’ll help if they know you’re helping yourself. TaoA:M really doesn’t take long - I’ve seen people do it in a week. We used to suggest you do more animation exercises too but now I know that just taking an animation assignment on SO will serve just as well.

martin
Day 13

There’s a lot of behind-the-scenes chatter about how we’re going to get Newbies involved in animation. Mostly, I just listen because I’d like to have a hierarchy of command this time… On TWO, I was personally managing almost every animator. That kind of flat command structure has emotional drawbacks: when people are frustrated, there’s no “higher up” to blame, (just me, Yikes!) Plus, people were looking to me to fix their programming problems… Not an ideal situation. I’m probably going to declare as “Director” on SO, (there was no Director on TWO). I’m still not a critic but I’ll figure out a way to fill that roll.

martin
Day 14

There were months at a time while I was working on TWO that A:M never crashed – and I was doing LOTS OF STUFF. This gave me confidence that when people tried to blame their problems on the software, I wouldn’t worry about it too much… Bugs have always been something people tried to beat me over the head with… But now, here I am, animating, rendering, doing sound, TD work, Hair, whatever – over and over… No crashes. (I do crash occasionally though - those lousy programmers). It must be something magic… Sometimes I can be working right next to a guy, and he crashes then crashes again. I watch what he’s doing… “Hey,” I say. “Close and open every time before working on a new Project.” I don’t know if that works or not but I have these little rituals I go through – and I don’t crash… I heard of other people doing stuff like that too… I think the software fairies know.
martin
Day 15

Often, I mean almost all the time, aspiring animators don’t finish what they start because they are disappointed with their beginner-like progress. Logically, everyone should understand that it takes time & experience to improve, especially to the point where people admire your work, but folks are emotional creatures, especially artists, and they act irrationally – so much so, that the initial excitement and potential drains out of them before they finish anything. However, there may be some hope if the atmosphere where sensitive people post their apprentice work is forgiving & supportive. We try to keep the A:M forums entirely uncritical, and this has led to the creation of dozens of accomplished A:M animators now working on SO.
martin
Day 16

I’ve read a lot of books about animators and animation studios. The personal histories and homilies appealed to me most because I could relate to people in that fashion but when they talked about things that required artistic skill, especially very subjective talents, I found almost no value in that information – except that beauty is in the eye of the beholder. Because I have read many 1000s of pages of animation history, and participated in the creation of many 100,000s of animation frames, I am in a position to boil it all down to one surefire statement: if you stick with it, you will succeed at some level – somebody will admire you and your work, no matter what, if for no other reason than that they respect your tenacity.
martin
Day 17

I’ve started the SO weekly emails. An interesting thing is that even though I request that people reply – many don’t. I was surprised by this on TWO but now I figure if I can get 50% to respond, people must be listening. I make the emails personal – meaning that I look at each person’s work and make supportive comments. I’ve tried to do this via the forum but it just doesn’t click! I guess a personal email shows that I’m putting time into the person and so they give some time back to me. Plus, everyone on SO seems like a friend that way.
martin
Day 18

When we started TWO, I choose the team by how accomplished they were as artists. This turned out to be WRONG! What I found we needed to complete a group project were people who would reliable contribute – with a GOOD ATTITUDE. After considering the situation for a long time, and experimenting with new people, I can confidently say that I’m an expert at identifying GOOD ATTITUDE. I’m kind of embarrassed it took me this long to discover something that the MBA books highlight and emphasize (I got an MBA in 1983!)
martin
Day 19

I’ve produced several animated shorts. The ones I wrote (most of them) are still special to me but if there was any value in them at all, it was as learning experiences. Here’s the biggest thing I learned – nobody else’s ideas are any better than yours! (If they were, that person would already be successful and moved on to bigger things.) I’ve been around long enough so I’ve noticed that the critics still haven’t done anything themselves! My goodness, don’t let others have any power over your own plans & aspirations. My favorite line from a song is, “you can’t even run your own life, I’ll be damned if you’ll run mine.”
martin
Day 20

Keyframing assignments went out! Yay! Things are really going to start rolling now. I can’t wait to get a sequence back and start up the Render Farm on them! It will also be interesting to see who returns their sequence soonest? (I’d bet money it would be Ken Heslip – that guy is a machine!) After we get some Keyframed sequences back, render and review them, we’ll hand out the other animation assignments. We’re testing a new methodology here, so I’m anxious to see if it works out or not? If not, we can always revert back to how we did it on TWO.
martin
Day 21

I wrote the SO songs while I was in Hawaii (Maui). I posted them to the forum my second week there (wireless at my motel), and within another week people were already writing melodies! Several of the songs in TWO got significant lyric adjustments by the musicians and that was okay with me – it’s collaboration after all. I wonder how many musicians will get involved in SO? (There were 3 on TWO.) I think, the more the better, but can there be too many?
martin
Day 22

A guy who amazes me with his level of success is Todd MacFarlane: “Spawn” comic book/animated series/movie, publisher, toys, baseball collector. By comparison, I am humbled and embarrassed by my own accomplishments. I suppose everyone feels that way… Bill Gates, Ted Turner, George Lucas, Oprah – man, those guys are blowing us away! (My generation anyway.) People I know personally, like Ed Catmull, my Ph.D. Research Advisor, are running Disney/Pixar. I guess you and me will just have to put our heads down and push to catch up. First “Telepresence”, then TWO, now SO, and the next after that?
martin
Day 23

We sent out 4 copies of TWO to various “distributors.” If you’ve read my 3D World articles, you’ll know I have experience trying to sell movies. We sold my first movie, “Telepresence,” for $600K but on the day we were supposed to receive the money, no check arrived and the supposed buyer (“Manga”) wouldn’t return our calls. Another distributor offered us only $5K! We ended up selling it territory-by-territory for a total of about $80K. (It cost $600K to make.) It took a while to get over that, (about 10 years). Here’s what I heard yesterday from one of the prospects, “Wanted to let you know that I’ve viewed Tin Woodsman of Oz. It was a charming story, well crafted and certainly enjoyable.”
martin
Day 24

Because of my previous movie-making & movie-selling experiences, I became an IP (“Intellectual Property”) attorney. It may not help sell anything but now I certainly know a lot more ways to get taken advantage of. Actually, it’s just the business - there’s way more product than people willing to watch it. That puts the power in the hands of the folks who say they can get it shown – almost all of which are blowing smoke up your butt. Our likely distributor, “the most honest guy I know in the business,” has a major smoke machine going, but… In the scheme of things… In a dishonest, immoral business… He’s actually not so bad. If anybody can sell TWO, he can. (Haven’t heard from him yet though, hmmm…)
martin
Day 25

I hadn’t been to the movies in a while when in a rush, Gwynne & I went to see “Hancock,” “Hulk II,” “Kung-fu Panda,” “Hellboy II,” and “Dark Knight II.” I was kind of disappointed with everything until I saw Heath Ledger’s “Joker.” OMG, that was one of the most powerful, convincing performances I have ever seen! I kept thinking about it afterwards. (I’m thinking about it now!) The last time a character has stuck with me this way was Kevin Spacey’s Keyser Söze in “Usual Suspects” (1995). Before that it was Rutger Hauer’s replicant in “Blade Runner” (1982), and first was Clint Eastwood’s “Outlaw Josie Wales” (1976). It’s so odd that Heath Ledger should have the performance of a lifetime then die!? Yikes.
martin
Day 26

As I predicted, Ken (KenH) Heslip returned his assignment first. Actually, since Ken did all of the Layout, I gave him a Level “2” difficulty sequence while 3 of the guys had Level “3.” Ken asked for a new assignment & I’m going to give it to him. Making the Keyframing assignments requires that I hear all of the dialog for the sequences together for the first time. I always look forward to the first time I play it through. We have some new voices and I ‘m getting used to them. When TWO started, I thought the voices were flat and maybe needed replacing but by the time TWO was done, I remember thinking every voice was perfect for the part. I wonder what causes that?
martin
Day 27

San Diego Comicon is going on and we have big crowds in front of our booth. Comicon is huge and is so popular and packed that there are NO MORE attendee tickets. Nope, you can’t even get in if you wanted to go! The nature is changing – a lot less comic books and much more of an emphasis on new movies. TWO is playing on the projection screen in the background of our booth. Young kids are standing at the front of the booth watching the movie all the way through – without sound! I think we may have something here.
NancyGormezano
QUOTE(martin @ Jul 27 2008, 05:18 AM) *
TWO is playing on the projection screen in the background of our booth. Young kids are standing at the front of the booth watching the movie all the way through – without sound! I think we may have something here.


Hee hee - That is great to hear ! I am fascinated to know how kids react to TWO.

(and I also hope you're getting compensated for kid-sitting ... 1 year subscription ? Why of course, Yes thank you, please...and Ramon can sit here.)

Way to go ! Yayyyyy.
martin
Day 28

In SO, we used a Linked Camera. That means, if the Linked Camera object is changed, all the existing Choreographies will get the change. I’d like to try some different resolutions, number of passes, etc. during the test render stage of SO, and this feature will help immensely. I’d also like to change from 24 fps to 30 fps but that needs to be done in every Project AND all of the existing Channels need to be “Snap to Frame” so that the animators won’t have fractional frame numbers to deal with.
martin
The characters so far...


Rodney
Wonderful.

Congrats to the SO team for the progress made thus far.
martin
Day 29

I’m definitely a “Get ‘Er Done” kind of guy. Throughout my career I’ve met people who hesitate because they worry about what other people will think, and soon those people are simply ships on the horizon. It’s kind of embarrassing when I meet up with someone I was close to after 5 years, we get to asking what each other is doing, and that person is STILL working on whatever it was 5 years ago, (or worse, nothing at all!)
martin
Day 30

We’ve got several people in the “Special Topics” area of the forum who are working on movies all by themselves. As we learned on TWO, making a complete movie is HARD! But it’s what’s required if you want the recognition that only comes from “making a movie” - anything less than a “movie” doesn’t count. People who plan to make a movie all by themselves need to remain committed and focused for several years, whereas a team can have members come-and-go, and it only takes a couple years. Still, measuring things in years it too long for a lot of people.
martin
Day 31

More Keyframing assignments went out. With Heath, James & Jason at a show, a lot of minor SO related stuff goes on hold. I guess it’s not a surprise that if the little stuff doesn’t get done, the big stuff doesn’t get done either. For example, I needed to send out some more assignments but when I went to put them together, half a dozen pieces of dialog hadn’t been cut yet. Unfortunately, I’m not in the loop as to where the original dialog is or what technique and accounting method they’re using to cut it, so I couldn’t do it myself. (I always say, “if I have to learn how to do it myself, I’ll just do it myself.”) As soon as the guys got back from the show and did the little stuff, I did the big stuff.
martin
Day 32

San Diego Comicon was a big success (it would have been an awesome show but Heath left the projector, money, laptop & creditcard machine in the cab) – we sold over 450 units to a crowd of potential SO participants. I love the cons because they are full of optimistic, non-judgmental people. Naive optimism is a GOOD thing. When people run out of naive optimism, that’s when they quit trying to achieve the impossible. “Impossible” but still, some tiny fraction of people do achieve their dreams. I don’t gamble but I’m constantly out there trying to achieve the impossible – that’s not gambling.
martin
Day 33

Jack Kirby is the most famous artist in “Silver Age” comics, and probably the most famous artist in all comic’s history. In fact, there’s a magazine devoted to his life & artwork, (and he’s been dead 15 years). Many artist purists don’t consider Kirby a great artist because he didn’t follow the rules. He didn’t treat art like some elitist bulwark against the untalented masses. Jack Kirby would draw 22 pages in 5 days, starting at the upper left first panel and end at the lower right panel of the last page. (I can always tell a Kirby pencil – it has that look.) So, here’s a guy that literally changed the face of comics, whose productivity is legendary, and whose influence in undeniable, yet there are critics out there calling the guy a hack. Yikes!
martin
Day 34

There’s just so much to learn about A:M! I’ve been watching the “SO: Animating” threads and I’m astounded how much basic information is still being taught to the “experts” - me included. (I didn’t even know there was a “Refresh View” menu item!) Master animators who don’t know how to use “Save As,” or what “Hold” interpolation is. All of that, and then you have to know how to animate too! How does anybody ever grok all this stuff?!
martin
Day 35

We’re doing some experimenting with lighting for SO. Coincidently, as these things often are, Dusan Kastelic (Perk, Chicory) and I were talking about rendering. Dusan said, “AO is a MUST if you don't have enough experience with lighting! AO means good lighting for Dummies!” I disagreed with this statement because I’ve never seen AO make much of a difference in a real scene. Dusan replied, “you should start lighting with AO in mind from the beginning. Start WITHOUT ANY light in the scene! Only with IBL and AO (and put both to 100%)!”

We’ll see, Dusan…
martin
Day 36

The history of AO (Ambient Occlusion) in A:M

In V6.1 (1997), we called it “Weathering.” (I’d seen a plug-in out of Spain called “Dirty” and I thought A:M could use something like that.) Those were the Pentium 90 days and Weathering took a long time to calculate so it also baked and saved “Weather” maps. (Somewhere around V13 Weathering got broken, and we decided to remove it from the software.) In V8.5 (2000), I added “Global Illumination” which also took color into consideration when casting the rays, and worked inside the Choreography. In 2006, Yves changed the name to “Ambient Occlusion” (what the rest of the 3D industry called it) and fine-tuned how the rays were distributed. During Yves' tests using uncolored models without lights to minimize influences, the famous “white render” look caught on. When novices talk about AO in A:M, it’s that “white render” look they’re thinking of.
zandoriastudios
Hi Martin! Did you happen to hear Ralph Bakshi speak at Comicon? Listening to his inspiring (Youtube) advice, I immediately thought of you and what you are creating with Animation:Master and the Oz films.

Here it is, if anyone needs to be inspired to just "do it!" smile.gif
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WApcUBcVMos&e
martin
QUOTE(zandoriastudios @ Aug 5 2008, 07:16 AM) *
Hi Martin! Did you happen to hear Ralph Bakshi speak at Comicon? Listening to his inspiring (Youtube) advice, I immediately thought of you and what you are creating with Animation:Master and the Oz films.

Here it is, if anyone needs to be inspired to just "do it!" smile.gif
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WApcUBcVMos&e

If that isn't a condemnation of elitist, gate-keeping "professionals," I don't know what is?
Paul Forwood
Nice find! I liked his suggestion of using ebay to sell a movie. I wonder if anyone has actually tried that.
PF_Mark
QUOTE(Paul Forwood @ Aug 5 2008, 11:28 AM) *
Nice find! I liked his suggestion of using ebay to sell a movie. I wonder anyone has actually tried that.



http://www.sp3d.net/

jakerupert
This Bakshi guy is really funny.
He has this typical eloquent big mouth attitude that`s obviously necessary for being leader and succsessfull.

He states, that he cannot understand, why 1 person= 1movie projects are not blooming around everywhere.

Here`s the simple answer:

Because its not that easy like he suggests it would be!!!

This one person in fact would need to be a real genius.

First he needs to have a good new idea, then elaborate it and write it down, even better scribble it and make an animatic.
( This task alone can take from app. 1 to 3 years)
Then do the voices and sound ( half year ).
Then the 3-D stuff: modeling, rigging, setup, preparations, lighting ( 1 year )
animating and rendering ( another year )
sales & distribution: maybe years

So besides that this guy would have to be quite a good writer,drawer,computer technician,modeler,rigger,lighter,animator,director,salesman
( at least I would take in account 5 years for learning all this ) he must have the stamina for staying focused that long and make a modest
living during that time.

So its about 10 years ( see for example the intervall between Telepresence and TWO with even a sophisticated company and many people involved ) of hard work with a vage chance to make some money later.
( I doubt it, iIf Jeff Lew for instance has become a millioare in the meantime. )

I don`t want to take anybody here the wind out of the sails, but just warn you to not take everything what Ralph Bakshi says for too serious.

In my opinion this goal 1 person and 1 computer is great and I think it is getting nearer year by year ( also thanks to Hash AM ),
but it also is helpfull to be realsitic about what is really possible now or in the near future.

So I would vote for collaborative projects like SO and smaller projects for the time beiing, while working on the big project slowly but steadily
in the background over the years.

;>) Jake

largento
Actually, I think Bakshi was talking about getting 4 or 5 guys together, not doing it solo, but he makes a valid point. The way big corporations stay in power is by convincing people that only a big corporation can do it.

I saw an old 60 Minutes story on the Muppets (from 1978 or so) and the question was raised, where are all the copycat puppet shows to compete with The Muppet Show? The answer was that The Muppet Show was so expensive to produce that nobody thought they could compete with them with an inferior product.

With the internet, there is the *need* for scores and scores of entertainment content. And you don't need to get a very big slice of the internet to be wildly successful. It's a big planet we've got... if you can find 10,000 people who like you're work enough to buy some of your merch, you're there.

But the mindset has to be that you are going to do *all* of the work... not look to somebody else to tell you what you do... or do it for you.

zandoriastudios
QUOTE
This Bakshi guy is really funny.
He has this typical eloquent big mouth attitude that`s obviously necessary for being leader and succsessfull.

He states, that he cannot understand, why 1 person= 1movie projects are not blooming around everywhere.

Here`s the simple answer:

Because its not that easy like he suggests it would be!!!

This one person in fact would need to be a real genius.


That Bakshi guy IS a real genius....
martin
Day 37

More and more of the TWO team are coming back for SO. We started small, just me, Nancy, Holmes, Ken & Mark, to get things underway. Then we expanded to 1st tier of Keyframers: Marcos, George, Mike, Stephen & David. Now we’ve got most of the rest of the core TWO team ready to take In-Between assignments. The 1st In-Between assignment went out to Michel. Paula is next. Steve & Toby are waiting for a bit.
jakerupert
QUOTE(zandoriastudios @ Aug 6 2008, 05:42 AM) *
QUOTE
This Bakshi guy is really funny.
He has this typical eloquent big mouth attitude that`s obviously necessary for being leader and succsessfull.

He states, that he cannot understand, why 1 person= 1movie projects are not blooming around everywhere.

Here`s the simple answer:

Because its not that easy like he suggests it would be!!!

This one person in fact would need to be a real genius.


That Bakshi guy IS a real genius....



< And so what?
He isn`t the one, who is going to do, what he suggests, because he thinks, he is too old for it.
martin
QUOTE(jakerupert @ Aug 6 2008, 07:55 AM) *
< And so what?
He isn`t the one, who is going to do, what he suggests, because he thinks, he is too old for it.

When he was young, he DID do it (Google him) - he just didn't use computers. We've sold A:M to him a couple times over the years... I think I'll try and contact him again. (Bob Taylor was Bakshi's Director for a few films.)
martin
Day 38

Modeling on SO seems more low key than on TWO but that’s probably because SO’s Preproduction stage was low key. There’s still a lot of set modeling to do. Eric is just finishing up Jinx Castle (and it’s awesome!) but Jinxtown & Jinxland are waiting. Many of Brautighan’s Balloons are ready but the Bazaar is not. And, of course, everything will be refined. We have some good volunteers modeling & texturing the props. Holmes is managing all that. (If you get an email assignment from “Scarecrow of Oz” – that’s Holmes.)
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